Read Me

Aside from my musings on all things literary, you can check out some of my writing around the web:

Fiction

  • “Independent Contractor Agreement” in The EEEL, January 2016
  • “The Fiction Student, or the Mystery is Gone” in Luna Luna, August 2014
  • “The Closing of Joe’s Bar” in Clackamas Literary Review, July 2014
  • “Third-Party Agreement” in The EEEL, June 2014
  • “Upstairs” in Vol. 1 Brooklyn, April 2013; reprinted in Esquire Russia, April 2014
  • “The Valkyrie Sleeps Alone” in Housefire, April 2013
  • “Boy Named Rome” in Tin House’s Open Bar, March 2013

Non-fiction

  • “When Your Hometown is the Last Place to Accept Who You Are” in Literary Hub, May 2017
  • “Tom Robbins was my Spiritual Advisor” in The Millions, January 2017
  • “Wild Unknown Country” in Hobart Pulp, January 2017
  • “What We Talk About When We Talk About Titles” in Vol. 1 Brooklyn, October 2016
  • “10 Short Stories for the International Day of the Girl” in Lit Hub, October 2016
  • “Is Weed a Women’s Issue?” in DAME, April 2015
  • “‘I’m telling the stories that I want to tell.’ A conversation with Cristina Moracho” in Late Night Library, March 2015
  • “I Spent A Year Following #ReadWomen2014, And I Learned 5 Big Lessons From Reading Female Voices” in Bustle, February 2015
  • “’One Relieves the Other’: Eileen Myles on Second Novels, Poet’s Novels, and Punctuation” in Vol. 1 Brooklyn, January 2015
  • “Church Exit Interview Form” in The EEEL, January 2015
  • “Feminist Porn and Erotica for Women Are Easier to Find Than You’d Think, Thanks to Erika Lust” in Bustle, December 2014
  • “Carver’s Country” in Vol. 1 Brooklyn, November 2014
  • “The 2014 Bad Sex In Fiction Award Nominees Are Writing About Sex In Isolation From the Rest of the Story — That’s the Problem” in Bustle, November 2014

 

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3 thoughts on “Read Me

  1. Allan G. Smorra says:

    I just read “The Valkyrie Sleeps Alone.” Each of the stories could stand alone separately just fine but the way you wove them together made the story so much more powerful. Thank you.

    • Kait says:

      Thanks so much for reading. That one to me was all about stories–legends, mythologies, fairy tales. We tell stories to cope, in this case to cope with losing someone. Each one could have been real or none, but to me that’s never the point. The point is why we tell the story in the first place. I’m glad you liked it.

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